Generación, compartición y captura de VALOR (social): eAprendiz

 

La ERA SOCIAL... ¿hasta qué punto el contexto global ha cambiado la forma en que se crea valor?

You might notice that I have used the term social era. It's not to create more jargon, it's to emphasize a point: that social is more than the stuff the marketing team deals with. It's something that allows organizations (y a los individuos-como organizaciones individuales emergentes-) to do things entirely differently.

How does this work? What are the rules? What does it mean for all parts of my business?

let me start with three major shifts that I see:

 

Generación, difusión y captura de VALOR social (como aspecto crítico del perfil eAprendiz,

'experto Aprendiz'):

Un NUEVO CONTEXTO, en un nuevo entorno 'vital'... La ERA SOCIAL

'Gazelas vs Gorilas'

It's helpful to call this new context the Social Era to emphasize a point: while in the industrial era, organizations became more powerful by being bigger, in the Social Era, companies can also be powerful by working with others. While the industrial era was about making a lot of stuff and convincing enough buyers to consume it, the Social Era is about the power of communities, of collaboration and co-creation. In the industrial era, power was from holding what we valued closed and separate; in the Social Era, there is another framework for how we engage one another — an open one.

Here's the simplest way to define the Social Era. The industrial era primarily honored the institution as a construct of creating value. And the information age (inclusive of Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 phases) primarily honored the value that data could provide to institutional value creation. It allowed for greater efficiency to do the same things that were done in the industrial era. The Social Era honors the value creation starting with the single unit of a connected human. In this framework, powerful organizations look less like an 800-pound gorilla and more like fast, fluid, flexible networks of connected individuals — like, say, a herd of 800 nimble gazelles.

para nosotros eAprendices conectados (empoderamiento personal, de abajo- arriba,  pero además con el calificativo de 'valor social' ('auto-eco-organización' individual, grupal y colectiva)

Companies cannot survive (let alone prosper) without recognizing that Social as a phenomenon can allow us to redefine our organizations to be inherently more fast fluid and flexible by its very design.

Today, too many organizations that think their status as an "800-pound gorilla" gives them an edge are struggling to survive, let alone thrive. They underestimate social to their great detriment. They see it as the purview of two functions: marketing and service. It's either "Like us on Facebook!" or "We're so sorry you're having a problem." While a few have figured out that they can use social to listen to the market — sort of like putting a stethoscope to the markhttp://www.sociedadytecnologia.org/pages/add/82187et heartbeat — they have yet to figure out there is more to this Social thing.

So before we can explore the Social Era, we need to disaggregate two words — social is not always attached to the word media. Social can be and is more than marketing or communications-related work.

When we look at all the parts together, we can see how Social affects all parts of the business model: the way an organization creates, delivers, and captures value. They also shift the ethos by which we lead and work.

(shift in focus)...con profundas implicaciones (negocios,instituciones, sociedad, cómo trabajamos/comportamos/aprendemos, ...)

las organizaciones están sintiendo la era social a su alrededor, pero sin advertir cuán significativo es el cambio que se ha producido. Debido a que se ha presentado en los bits y piezas, a través de modelos freemium, crowdsourcing, comunidades online, fuerzas de trabajo virtuales, redes sociales, etc, es fácil pasar por alto hasta qué punto el contexto global ha cambiado la forma en que se crea valor.

the idea has developed with your input, as these ideas were first shared in a five-part series

 

Part 1: Rules for the Social Era

Part 2: Social Means Freedom, for Better or for Worse

 

Part 3: Why Porter's Model No Longer Works

 

Part 4: Why Social Marketing Is So Hard

 

Part 5: Stop Talking About Social and Do It

 

ebook

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by Nilofer Merchant
Source: Harvard Business Press Books
88 pages.  Publication date: Sep 12, 2012

The era of social technologies provides seemingly endless opportunity, both for individuals and organizations. But it’s also the subject of seemingly endless hype. Yes, social tools allow us to do things entirely differently—but how do you really capitalize on that?

In 11 Rules for Creating Value in the Social Era, the newest in Harvard Business Review’s line of digital books (HBR Singles), social strategist and insightful blogger Nilofer Merchant argues that “social” is much more than “media.” Smart companies are letting social become the backbone of their business models, increasing their speed and flexibility by pursuing openness and fluidity. These organizations don’t operate like the powerful “800-pound gorillas” of yesteryear—but instead act more like a herd of 800 gazelles, moving together across a savannah, outrunning the competition.

This ebook offers new rules for creating value, leading, and innovating in our rapidly changing world. These social era rules are both provocative and grounded in reality—they cover thorny challenges like forsaking hierarchy and control for collaboration; getting the most out of all talent; allowing your customers to become co-creators in your organization; inspiring employees through purpose in a world where money alone no longer wields that power; and soliciting community investment in an idea so that it can take hold and grow. 

 

 

Traditional Strategy Is Dead. Welcome to the #SocialEra

 La era de las tecnologías sociales ofrece oportunidades aparentemente sin fin, tanto para los individuos como para las organizaciones

Yes, social tools allow us to do things entirely differently—but how do you really capitalize on that?

The companies thriving today are operating by a new set of rules — Social Era rules. Companies like REI, Kickstarter, Kiva, Twitter, Starbucks — they get it. They live it. And to them, notions like distributing power to everyone, working in extended community to get things done, or allowing innovation to happen anywhere and everywhere are, well, ridiculously obvious. But too many major companies — Bank of America, Sports Authority, United Airlines, Best Buy, and Walmart to name just a few — that need to get it, don't.

 

In  11 Rules for Creating Value in the Social Era, the newest in Harvard Business Review’s line of digital books (HBR Singles), social strategist and insightful blogger Nilofer Merchant argues that “social” is much more than “media.”  Smart companies are letting social become the backbone of their business models, increasing their speed and flexibility by pursuing openness and fluidity. These organizations don’t operate like the powerful “800-pound gorillas” of yesteryear—but instead act more like a herd of 800 gazelles, moving together across a savannah, outrunning the competition.

 

This quick-read offers new rules for creating value, leading, and innovating in our rapidly changing world. These social era rules are both provocative and grounded in reality—they cover thorny challenges like forsaking hierarchy and control for collaboration; getting the most out of all talent; allowing your customers to become co-creators in your organization; inspiring employees through purpose in a world where money alone no longer wields power; and soliciting community investment in an idea so that it can take hold and grow.

The Industrial Era and the Information Age are over and their governing rule are passé. Leading in the Social Era requires a rethink and reimagination of what can be. Read 11 Rules for Creating Value in the Social Era to be ready to meet the challenges of this new age and thrive

 

 

Supporting team and group collaboration

 

 

Social learning is for human work

 Social business: it’s NOT about the next big thing, Pam Moore, Business2Community, 18 December 2011 The competitive edge of the social business, Esko Kilpi, 20 November 2011 Why do we need social business, Harold Jarche, 19 October 2011 Why social media is not enough to become a ‘social organization.’ Gartner, 18 October 2011 Social business: revolution or differentiator, Seth Gottlieb, 26 September 2011 Social Business Doesn’t Mean What You Think It Does, Neither Does Enterprise 2.0 Deb Lavoy, 7 September 2011 - See more at: http://c4lpt.co.uk/new-workplace-learning/team-learning/#sthash.Vpm64Ljz.dpuf

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 Although, as Josh Bersin’s Continuous Learning Model diagram shows, e-learning might be used to start the process of continuous learning within an organisation, coaching, mentoring, communities of practice and social networks are much more significant. Harold Jarche’s chart shows that learning within work teams – as a part of getting work done – is also key.

  1. ASTD NY: Josh Bersin on Continuous Learning (Part 1)

    www.sellonsolutions.com/.../astd-ny-josh-bersin-on-...
     
    16/06/2013 - ASTD NY: Josh Bersin on Continuous Learning (Part 1). ASTDNY logoJosh Bersin, Principal & Founder of Bersin by Deloitte (formerly Bersin ...
    1. ASTDNY: Josh Bersin on Continuous Learning (Part Two)

      www.sellonsolutions.com/.../astdny-josh-bersin-on-c...
       
      23/06/2013 - Part Two (which touches on Learning Architecture, Audience Analysis, Learning Culture, Talent Management, and Measurement)
       
      You can read the one-page summary of my write-up on the ASTDNY blog here.
       

      the Bersin Impact Measurement Framework:

      Satisfaction (level 1)

      Learning (level 2)

      Adoption (whether the target audience completed the training)

      Utility (would learners recommend the training as useful)

      Efficiency (whether the learning experience was cost-effective)

      Alignment (to identified business need)

      Attainment (how well it met targeted goals: on time, on budget, well-presented material, etc.)

      Contribution (success of social context)

      Feedback (who contributed it, how much received, etc.)

      Activity (volume, behaviors)

      Individual Performance

      Organizational Performance

      Josh brought his thought-provoking talk to a close with this mantra: “Remember that learning is a continuous process and is always talent-driven.”


       
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      The growth of enterprise social networks and collaboration platforms now offers big opportunities for L&D to widen their scope and support continuous learning within teams, groups and communities in the workplace.  But supporting social collaboration requires a different approach for L&D. It’s not about packaging up courses or resources FOR teams, but working in partnership with team leaders to “scaffold” the opportunities for learning to take place
      46-47 – And for effective collaborative working and learning to take place, it won’t be just about implementing the technology, but also about helping the team members acquire a range of new personal and social skills (for more on this, see Connected Worker)
      48 -52 For those in L&D who don’t feel ready or able to work directly with teams, then they can support more social approaches through Social Onboarding or Social Mentoring, or even through organising formal social online learning experiences
      53 There are therefore a number of “levels” of application of social tools for learning.
      54 -62  But one significant way L&D can begin to join up learning and working is through enterprise community management, and some of the activities involved are mentioned in the slideset.

 

 

    Enrique Rubio

    Enrique Rubio

    Reflexiones sobre aprendizaje, tecnología y sostenibilidad

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