perfil eEstudiante

 

the primary and secondary National Curriculum (ENGLAND)

Colleen Young's List: Personal Learning & Thinking Skills (https://www.diigo.com/list/colleenyoung/plts)

 

In this section

Assessment

 

Personal, learning and thinking skills (PLTS) aim to develop self-managers, creative thinkers, reflective learners, problem-solvers, team workers, independent learners and effective communicators. PLTS provide a national framework which schools can build on in order to meet the needs of their young people and broader communities. These include skills that relate to learning in subjects as well as other more generic, transferable skills. PLTS are embedded in the new programmes of study and are an essential part of the Diploma qualifications.

Functional skills are those core elements of English, mathematics and ICT that provide individuals with the skills and abilities they need to operate confidently, effectively and independently in life, their communities and work.

 

http://archive.teachfind.com/qcda/curriculum.qcda.gov.uk/key-stages-3-and-4/skills/personal-learning-and-thinking-skills/index.html

 

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Personal, learning and thinking skills

 

What are PLTS?

Personal, learning and thinking skills (PLTS) provide a framework for describing the qualities and skills needed for success in learning and life. The PLTS framework has been developed and refined over a number of years in consultation with employers, parents, schools, students and the wider public.

The framework comprises six groups of skills:

  • independent enquirers

  • creative thinkers

  • reflective learners

  • team workers

  • self-managers

  • effective participants.

For each group of skills, a focus statement sums up the range of skills and qualities involved. This is accompanied by a set of outcome statements that describe the relevant skills, behaviours and personal qualities.

Each group of skills is distinctive and coherent. The groups are also interconnected and learners are likely to encounter skills from several groups in any one learning experience. For example, an independent enquirer sets goals for their research with clear success criteria (reflective learner) and organises their time and resources effectively to achieve these goals (self-manager). To develop independence, learners need to apply skills from all six groups in a wide range of contexts.

Key actions:

Getting ahead with personal, learning and thinking skills   (MUST +++)

http://www.capitaltalent.co.uk/pdf/Personal-learning&thinking.pdf    

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Functional skills

 

 

What are functional skills?

Functional skills are those core elements of English, mathematics and ICT that provide individuals with the skills and abilities they need to operate confidently, effectively and independently in life, their communities and work.

The functional skills standards are embedded in the revised programmes of study for English, mathematics and ICT. However, functionality within the curriculum is not limited to these subjects. The curriculum opportunities in the programmes of study for all subjects encourage working beyond the school and making links with other subjects and many key processes have the potential for functional skills development. 

Principles of functional skills

Functional skills should be integrated into the curriculum. To be effective, functional skills teaching must be relevant and allow learners to engage with real situations in the real world.

Learners need opportunities to:

  • apply their skills in plausible contexts or use their skills for real purposes

  • engage with the world beyond the classroom

  • integrate learning by linking knowledge within and between the functional areas

  • spend time planning and developing their work

  • make choices and decisions, think creatively and act independently

  • experience success in real situations as a result of using their skills effectively.

Functional skills in the curriculum

Functional skills are embedded in the revised programmes of study for English, mathematics and ICT. In addition, all subjects provide rich opportunities to develop functional skills. 
However, individual subjects by themselves are unlikely to provide the complete range of experiences and practical opportunities learners need. The wider school curriculum provides functional skills opportunities, for example:

  • going beyond lessons and building on learners’ wider experiences

  • working across subjects, linking elements from the three core functional subjects.

All learning experiences should be part of a coherent set and functional skills objectives should be identified for each activity. To have a meaningful impact, the curriculum should encourage learners to use skills in an integrated way. For example, in English, it is likely that most real-life contexts to solve problems or take action would involve a combination of reading, writing, speaking and listening rather than dealing with each area in isolation.

 

Functional skills and English, mathematics and ICT...

 

Functional ICT skills

 

Individuals with functional ICT skills are confident and capable when using ICT systems and tools to meet a variety of needs in a range of contexts. They are able to:

  • use ICT to find, select and bring together relevant information

  • develop, interpret and exchange information for a purpose

  • apply ICT safely to enhance their learning and the quality of their work.

More about functional skills in ICT at key stage 3

More about functional skills in ICT at key stage 4